How did we survive?

Anonymous
Having a newborn, 3 yo, and 5 yo would always be terrible. Pandemic or not. If anything the pandemic would have made it easier your spouse was home and there was nowhere to go.
Anonymous
The human spirit can endure a lot.
We Americans are spoiled - safe roof over our heads, clean running water, food, access to medicine… So many around the world have none of those basic necessities and to them these are unimaginable luxuries.
Millions of people live in constant danger in war torn countries as I type this 😢
So what we overcame was unpleasant but not really a hardship imo. I too had young kids, so I know what you are talking about.
Anonymous
OP - well thanks for the reality check. I do have empathy and sympathy for everyone during that time.

I didn't have PPD with my other two kids and I always wonder if I would have had it regardless of the pandemic or if it was related to the stress of both postpartum and the lockdown. But man it kicked my butt. I have never been so close to the edge before. I worry every day I will return to that sort of mental breakdown. And since it was lockdown there was nobody to talk to. I never saw my OBGYN, never got screened for PPD, had no follow up with any sort of doctor for a long time.
Anonymous
I have one kid who was three when COVID hit. I was 100% absolutely living my best life. I had to strategize, getting up early and staying up late to make sure work got done, but I filled my days with spending time with my kid. Some of my very favorite memories of her childhood are going to be March-June 2020.
Anonymous
I worked with a lady who was a little girl during WW2 in Germany. She and her mother (or maybe her grandmother) walked from town to town with a pushcart trying to get food during WW2. They also walked many many miles trying to evade the Russian soldiers known for ramping women and girls. Her Dad fought in Russia and had to walk home from Russia to Germany after the war.

She ended up marrying an American GI at a young age and came to America at the end of the war. The American GI was her ticket out from years of hunger.
Anonymous
Ya not much sympathy here OP. If you’re the type to be “sooooo angry” at childfree friends because they didn’t have children to take care of you will always be comparing yourself and finding those better off. They chose no children and you chose to have 3 , and choices have consequences.

Should those who fared worse during the pandemic be “soooooo angry” at you who had maternity leave, was able to stay home with your children, and both you and your husband kept your jobs? If anything, be angry at policymakers , not your so called friends.
Anonymous
OP, I have sympathy for you. I only had one kid who was 4 at the start of pandemic, but I'm a single mom. I did try to kill myself at one point, but obviously it didn't take.
Anonymous
OP, during the lockdown my kids were in HS and had hard time not being able to socialize. I do consider us being lucky to have kids of that age. But I did keep thinking of parents with younger kids being locked up and had sympathy for those families. Or single moms with little kids. Or single dads. It must have been a rough time for you, folks.
Anonymous
I felt bad for people who lived alone. That would have been so terrible and isolating.
Anonymous
OP, you can be angry at me. You got hit by bad timing. We were lucky in that we were not.

Our kids were in 3rd and 6th. I already worked from home. We had just moved to a different state where virtual school only lasted a couple months. Our parents stayed healthy. We just turned off the news because what was the point.

Sure, it was a boring at times but I think my kids will think back on it without any stress.

We were so lucky.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:OP - well thanks for the reality check. I do have empathy and sympathy for everyone during that time.

I didn't have PPD with my other two kids and I always wonder if I would have had it regardless of the pandemic or if it was related to the stress of both postpartum and the lockdown. But man it kicked my butt. I have never been so close to the edge before. I worry every day I will return to that sort of mental breakdown. And since it was lockdown there was nobody to talk to. I never saw my OBGYN, never got screened for PPD, had no follow up with any sort of doctor for a long time.


I’m a previous poster and THIS I have empathy for. PPD is awful and incredibly painful. I’m so sorry you had to go through that without help from your care team. My eldest is 22 and I still can a pit in my stomach when I think about the PPD I had with him.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:I worked with a lady who was a little girl during WW2 in Germany. She and her mother (or maybe her grandmother) walked from town to town with a pushcart trying to get food during WW2. They also walked many many miles trying to evade the Russian soldiers known for ramping women and girls. Her Dad fought in Russia and had to walk home from Russia to Germany after the war.

She ended up marrying an American GI at a young age and came to America at the end of the war. The American GI was her ticket out from years of hunger.


My mother was a child in England during WW2 and after. She didn’t blink an eye during Covid. It was nothing compared to being bombed, no food, her father liberating Nazi death camps, etc. She didn’t minimize what others’ were going through during COVID but she never complained.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:Have been thinking back to the beginning of the pandemic/shut downs and I wonder how I mentally survived it. When shutdown happened I had a newborn, 3 year old and 5 year old. Plus a husband who wasn't used to working from home, working 60-80 hours a week. My PPD spiraled out of control during March-April and I sincerely don't know how I managed to keep my newborn alive during that time. I was sleeping in 45 minute increments at night and up all day with my toddler/5 year old. Only saving grace was I that I didn't have to work since I was on maternity leave.

Now thinking back on it I am surprised that my family even managed to come out of that time unscathed. I think about all my friends who had older children or child free friends who were "living their best lives" and sometimes get sooo angry. I know it was all situational but god it was such a hard period of time for those of us with young kids. I also feel for parents who had older children who missed major life milestones like prom and graduation or pivotal years in college.


Good lord,OP! You cannot be serious. Think of people in Ukraine and Gaza living through war and starvation and you have the nerve to complain about the pandemic?! Think of the parents im Uvalde, TX and Buffalo, NY, Sandy Hook. South Carolina, Colorado, Florida whose children were murdered and all the government did was offer useless thoughts and prayers. Yet you have the unmitigated nerve to of complain about the pandemic. A missed prom is nothing compared to a dead child. You should hang your head in shame for even thinking you have anything to complain about because the entire world was going through the pandemic at the save time. People like you make me angry. Your selfishness and self centeredness is mind boggling!
Anonymous
OP, I agree with you. Having a newborn is already so isolating and not being able to rely on your village during that time is incredibly lonely. What made this so bad was that humans are supposed to band together in hard times, but we were all separate and alone. It was very hard to be so isolated from the tribe.
Anonymous
Then and now - my heart goes out to young families like yours and those with younger kids during the pandemic years. I don't think we yet understand the full societal impact. It was tough on many segments, but those with babies and young school-age kids had it the worst imo. As for my segment I'm happy to no longer be a fat "alcoholic" binging on bad TV for months on end - I'm ashamed actually at my pandemic self - we all need to be kind to ourselves and thankful it's over for now.
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