Teacher didn't change a 59 TO D

Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:The teacher is not the problem in this picture.



He ended up with E for the semester for Spanish 1A. I just wish he would've emailed me or give my son extra credit so he could've passed the semester. He did but doing the 1st marking period, but improved a lot doing the second marking period.


Sounds like you need to step it up as a parent and stay on top of things, as well as teach your kid to stay on top of things.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:The teacher is not the problem in this picture.



He ended up with E for the semester for Spanish 1A. I just wish he would've emailed me or give my son extra credit so he could've passed the semester. He did but doing the 1st marking period, but improved a lot doing the second marking period.


You have 24/7 access to grades. Why didn’t you check in, especially if he had an E the first marking period.

This is what is wrong in education right now, there’s no accountability on the student and parent end.

Do your job so that I can do my job


+10000. As a parent I agree. Schools give out Chromebooks. The give out MiFis to those that need them. The public library lends laptops for a specific time period. ParentVue can be accessed on phones. Teachers can be emailed. Counselors can be emailed. The entire school administration and central office can be emailed or called. There are special education resources. There are tutoring resources.

This mentality that teachers need to keep doing more and more while students and parents do less and less is ridiculous.
Anonymous
MCPS special educator of 15 years here.

Respectfully, it gets real old when people want to blame bad grades on not following the IEP. It's such a cop out.

As a parent, you are on the IEP team too. You bear a lot of responsibility. Sorry if you don't like to hear that but you are one of the most important people on the IEP team.

So over the past half-year have you, as a parent, been:

- communicating with the teacher
- communicating with their case manager
- reaching out to the RTSE
- requesting a parent-teacher conference
- requesting a periodic IEP meeting
- checking ParentVue for missing assingmnets
- setting up routines at home to do work and review Canvas/studentvue
- reaching out to your kid's resource teacher if they have resource as a service on their IEP (which they prob should if they have ADHD and a SLD as you said)

I could go on. I just can't stand hearing over and over and over parent saying "the teacher never emailed me."

Guess who else's teacher didn't email them? Millions of people who went through school prior to like 2010 or whatever.

Hold yourself accountable as a parent. Step it up. You got this.

Sorry if you're offended but your kid is on the verge of becoming an adult. You owe it to them to model personal accountability, good routines, and learning from challenges to get better next time.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:MCPS special educator of 15 years here.

Respectfully, it gets real old when people want to blame bad grades on not following the IEP. It's such a cop out.

As a parent, you are on the IEP team too. You bear a lot of responsibility. Sorry if you don't like to hear that but you are one of the most important people on the IEP team.

So over the past half-year have you, as a parent, been:

- communicating with the teacher
- communicating with their case manager
- reaching out to the RTSE
- requesting a parent-teacher conference
- requesting a periodic IEP meeting
- checking ParentVue for missing assingmnets
- setting up routines at home to do work and review Canvas/studentvue
- reaching out to your kid's resource teacher if they have resource as a service on their IEP (which they prob should if they have ADHD and a SLD as you said)

I could go on. I just can't stand hearing over and over and over parent saying "the teacher never emailed me."

Guess who else's teacher didn't email them? Millions of people who went through school prior to like 2010 or whatever.

Hold yourself accountable as a parent. Step it up. You got this.

Sorry if you're offended but your kid is on the verge of becoming an adult. You owe it to them to model personal accountability, good routines, and learning from challenges to get better next time.


I’m the parent who successfully contested my son’s grade. MCPS admitted that the teachers didn’t follow the IEP and apologized. My son was given the opportunity to try to pass several classes, which he did albeit with low Ds.

Sometimes despite a parent’s best efforts and active participation in their child’s education, things go wrong because teachers screw up. We don’t know what OP did here but we do know that teachers don’t always get it right either.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:I would be delighted my kid was being held responsible.

Sure you would 😉🙃
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:MCPS special educator of 15 years here.

Respectfully, it gets real old when people want to blame bad grades on not following the IEP. It's such a cop out.

As a parent, you are on the IEP team too. You bear a lot of responsibility. Sorry if you don't like to hear that but you are one of the most important people on the IEP team.

So over the past half-year have you, as a parent, been:

- communicating with the teacher
- communicating with their case manager
- reaching out to the RTSE
- requesting a parent-teacher conference
- requesting a periodic IEP meeting
- checking ParentVue for missing assingmnets
- setting up routines at home to do work and review Canvas/studentvue
- reaching out to your kid's resource teacher if they have resource as a service on their IEP (which they prob should if they have ADHD and a SLD as you said)

I could go on. I just can't stand hearing over and over and over parent saying "the teacher never emailed me."

Guess who else's teacher didn't email them? Millions of people who went through school prior to like 2010 or whatever.

Hold yourself accountable as a parent. Step it up. You got this.

Sorry if you're offended but your kid is on the verge of becoming an adult. You owe it to them to model personal accountability, good routines, and learning from challenges to get better next time.


I’m the parent who successfully contested my son’s grade. MCPS admitted that the teachers didn’t follow the IEP and apologized. My son was given the opportunity to try to pass several classes, which he did albeit with low Ds.

Sometimes despite a parent’s best efforts and active participation in their child’s education, things go wrong because teachers screw up. We don’t know what OP did here but we do know that teachers don’t always get it right either.


I'm the person you replied to.

You are 100% right. There are indeed negligent teachers. I do not disagree with you.

I'm glad that you were able to resolve that situation you described.

But at the same time, I believe in most cases it's the fault of the student and parent for the low grade—IEP or not.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:MCPS special educator of 15 years here.

Respectfully, it gets real old when people want to blame bad grades on not following the IEP. It's such a cop out.

As a parent, you are on the IEP team too. You bear a lot of responsibility. Sorry if you don't like to hear that but you are one of the most important people on the IEP team.

So over the past half-year have you, as a parent, been:

- communicating with the teacher
- communicating with their case manager
- reaching out to the RTSE
- requesting a parent-teacher conference
- requesting a periodic IEP meeting
- checking ParentVue for missing assingmnets
- setting up routines at home to do work and review Canvas/studentvue
- reaching out to your kid's resource teacher if they have resource as a service on their IEP (which they prob should if they have ADHD and a SLD as you said)

I could go on. I just can't stand hearing over and over and over parent saying "the teacher never emailed me."

Guess who else's teacher didn't email them? Millions of people who went through school prior to like 2010 or whatever.

Hold yourself accountable as a parent. Step it up. You got this.

Sorry if you're offended but your kid is on the verge of becoming an adult. You owe it to them to model personal accountability, good routines, and learning from challenges to get better next time.


I’m the parent who successfully contested my son’s grade. MCPS admitted that the teachers didn’t follow the IEP and apologized. My son was given the opportunity to try to pass several classes, which he did albeit with low Ds.

Sometimes despite a parent’s best efforts and active participation in their child’s education, things go wrong because teachers screw up. We don’t know what OP did here but we do know that teachers don’t always get it right either.


I'm the person you replied to.

You are 100% right. There are indeed negligent teachers. I do not disagree with you.

I'm glad that you were able to resolve that situation you described.

But at the same time, I believe in most cases it's the fault of the student and parent for the low grade—IEP or not.


I don’t disagree with you. I think our case was unusual and I think it happened because the IEP started at an off time and was unexpected. The thought process was to move him to the certificate program and the IEP was an unexpected last ditch effort that a particular assistant principal and I pushed for. I think that resulted in communication snafus because it wasn’t a single teacher that didn’t do what was required. It was a big snafu though and would have kept him out of Edison, which was wildly successful for him.
Anonymous
I have two dyslexic/dysgraphic kids that struggle academically, yet managed an A and B in French 1. It was a massive struggle as they barely can write the same things in English. They put in the time and
Work. There’s no excuse.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
OP my advice is to focus your energy. You wanted the teacher to email or offer extra credit. Really? That's a low bar to hold a teacher of an IEP kid. How about teacher check-ins with your son, check for understanding, breaking down tasks into smaller chunks, encouraging the use of office hours, and parent communication during the quarter? Extra credit isn't really a thing in many classes so focus back on the class content itself, and on your son's ability to demonstrate what he has learned.


+1. NP, parent of 8th grader with ASD/ADHD/LD with IEP that has all the bolded supports and more. School doesn't implement them all as written, of course, but that's not the point. OP, child with the profile you described needs a better IEP including a Resource class (MS and HS) and a fresh look at the course selection. The parent needs to go to the school -- the school is either not going to reach out to the parent or if they do it will only scratch the surface and parent needs to pick up the ball from there and run with it.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:I have two dyslexic/dysgraphic kids that struggle academically, yet managed an A and B in French 1. It was a massive struggle as they barely can write the same things in English. They put in the time and
Work. There’s no excuse.

DCUM maxim: what works for my kid works for everyone's kid!
And its corollary: what doesn't work for my kid doesn't work for anyone's kid!
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:The teacher is not the problem in this picture.



He ended up with E for the semester for Spanish 1A. I just wish he would've emailed me or give my son extra credit so he could've passed the semester. He did but doing the 1st marking period, but improved a lot doing the second marking period.



If your son "improved a lot" second semester and ended up with a 59%, your student more than likely does not know enough Spanish 1 to be successful in the next class. Maybe talk with the counselor about a schedule change to a different elective. They can retake Spanish 1A for grade replacement the next fall.
Anonymous
I work in a high school. The students who do not get bumped up when they are teetering are the ones who have annoyed their teacher by being on their phone, or neglecting to come in for extra help, or generally being d$cks. Sorry, OP.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:Will you be okay with a teacher didn't change a 59.10% to D?

A 59.5% should round up to a D but not a 59.1%.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:Does any other school district use E for failing grades instead of F? I’ve never heard of it until MCPS.


E was originally used everywhere.

https://www.rd.com/article/no-e-grading-system/
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:Does any other school district use E for failing grades instead of F? I’ve never heard of it until MCPS.


E was originally used everywhere.

https://www.rd.com/article/no-e-grading-system/


Well, MCPS seems to be the only one using it now
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