UMD EA Results

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Anonymous wrote:To answer several persistent questions...

Honors>>>>Scholars>>other stuff

Money comes later (Mid-late Feb?) but don't expect a lot in-state, if anything. And Honors is *not* a guarantee of money though probably better chance but some non Honors admits get money too. BK, is, (I think) from Honors admits only however.

Honors is worthwhile if just for the housing and you may find it useful generally too. UH and Aces have the best housing and UH housing (PC and JW) is more convenient than ACES (PF Hall). There are other perfectly fine dorms too if you aren't Honors or are in other Honors programs. UH is easily the biggest Honors program, its the default, least specialized) but best housing and most class options.

There are also Honors versions of some key classes available only to Honors kids. Calculus, for example, and at least in that, all class hours are with the instructor in smaller classes. No discussion section with a TA, no huge lecture hall. Note, many TAs are fantastic, not trying to be critical.

Other programs (Scholars, etc) can be good opportunities but consider the cost (in time/effort): benefit analysis. Consider it even with Honors. Its 15 Credits in Honors. Is the payoff worth it? With the housing, yes, imo. Absent that...maybe.

FC is no big deal. In fact, kids I know like it. Don't view it as a failure. Look at some of the kids who didn't get in...its just a way for them to take more of the kids they should have taken in the first place...

Comp Sci..it will be much harder to declare CS for anyone not admitted directly. Not impossible but I would say do not count on it. Up til now, changing to CS has been fairly easy. Not easy anymore. Have a plan B or go somewhere else.

Thanks for the pertinent info. Does Honors guarantee housing for 4 yrs?

No most of the programs are 2 years. Varies by program. Info on website


That is inaccurate. Even if a program is 2 years, honors students are guaranteed 4 years of housing on campus. However, I don’t know any UMD student that stayed on campus 4 years. They all move off campus.


I made the mistake of checking a UMD Facebook group today. It wasn't even about housing. Except it was. Housing was all it was. Grim, tiny rooms in cheap apartment complexes in Greenbelt. Parking lots and highways. 1,000 a month to live with four roommates like you're in an exurban dystopia. What fun.

Huh? Thousands of student live within a half mile of campus. Something like 10 apartment complexes within walking distance.


Grim tiny rooms next to a highway in College Park? Where do I sign?


Maybe it’s time for your snowflake to live their own life?


Y'all are so defensive about a school no one else in the country cares about. I just think it's sad to see so many highly intelligent kids with so much potential pigeonholed into such narrow boxes in such an ugly provincial place.


Geez. You sound like you have a chip on your shoulder. No one gives a crap about what you think.


Not at all, lol. College Park was never on our list because it's an ugly, provincial place. It honestly just makes me sad, with so many excellent colleges out there that so many of you have such a small window for "success" for your kids. You only want them to have one of two or three majors, you only want them to stay in this area, you only want them to work for a limited number of government-subsidized local companies or agencies.

Your kids have so much potential, and this is all you can see.

dp.. my kid's potential is a double STEM major +1 year master, graduating in 4 years from UMD because that's what they want.

"Excellent" college is subjective. My DC#2 absolutely does not want a SLAC in the middle of nowhere. They would call that "provincial", and boring AF.

UMD is T50. Why on earth would people pay money for a college that is rated much much lower, and where the job prospects are much lower. Most of us don't have family money such that our kids can just do whatever they want and not think about getting a good paying job? Do you know how many grads can't find decent jobs after college?

I want my kids to go wherever they want. I have encouraged them to go study abroad. My spouse is a dual citizen, and we've encouraged them to go live in that country for a while. I've also told them to not be tied to this area. I'm originally from CA, and DC#2 wants to move back there at some point.

So you are also wrong about UMD parents wanting them to live "provincial" lives. This area is a very diverse area, more so than the Bay Area where I moved from. If my kids want to stay here, I see nothing wrong with that. It's more diverse than the vast majority of cities around the world. Ask anyone who has lived in a different country and who now lives here (like my spouse). Also, my kids are biracial, and there are some places in this country and around the world that I would not want them to live in.

You sound like an utter snob and completely clueless.


It's pretty normal not to find a job right after college--not the kind of job you mean, anyway. It's beyond privileged to think your kids are entitled to a good job right out of school, no matter where they go.

A few years of working your way up isn't the worst thing in life. You keep talking about how privileged you think other people are, then you have the gall to list your own privileges like they're nothing. Our kid has dual citizenship too, actually, being one half of an immigrant household, and it's fantastic they'll have the opportunity to use it someday.

Stop acting like UMD is some cheap community college with one breath, and then acting like it's the most prestigious place in the world with the next: it's neither. It's a state college in, as I said before, a state that most of the rest of the country doesn't care about. It's a fine school. I just don't think it's enough of a fine school to justify this kind of cutthroat admissions, or to justify staggering its freshmen admissions, or to justify paying full price for. Your opinion may differ.

I'm sure you're proud that your kid got in (unless you're the poster whose kids aren't even in college and then you're just sad... Because in all seriousness, odds are they won't get in.)

As for your kids being biracial, if you left your liberal bubble more, you might notice that no one really cares.


Not the poster you are replying to, but I am the poster whose kid isn’t applying this year. Thanks for the negativity. My kid has as much chance as the kid who got rejected from engineering which is why I’m so interested in this thread. That is, most kids with her stats would get in.


Well then, perhaps take a moment to consider why so many people are taking such high-acheiving kids with so much potential and trying to fit them through the same narrow doorway to stand in a very crowded room.

I don't hate UMD. I don't care if you believe me or not, but I don't.

But I do think there's something really wrong with our culture when it pushes all of its kids into the same little box. This whole UMD computer science/engineering cluster is truly insane.

I say that as outside observer: it makes absolutely no sense to me why you'd put your kids through this, especially when the odds of them getting into ivies and tech schools outside of Maryland are higher than they are for College Park. To summarize: your kids can get more money to go someplace else that's better or equal in prestige, and you're all still lined up at the same narrow hole.

(And then there's the fact that your favorite spectator sport is apparently watching other peoples' kids--mostly poorer kids--get brain damage for school spirit...)

Yeah, I don't get it.


As has already been said, for many of us it’s about the dollar amount and the value for money. $30k a year for UMD or $90k for MIT?


I think you don't understand that with its massive endowment and your kid's scores, you wouldn't pay 90k for MIT. It's true, (I don't know for sure, but I suspect), you might pay 45-50k, unless you're actually poor, in which case you'd pay nothing.

Is MIT worth beg, borrowing, or cashing in a 401k to make the difference?

Over UMD?

Uh... Yeah. Yeah, it is. In so many ways you can't imagine.

I'm not a snob about schools, (despite the crap I've said about UMD), but I am a realist. The universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious... if your kid has a shot at them, you don't turn it down. Not only will it offer them career benefits for life, not only will it open alumni and corporate doors, they'll receive exceptional educations. I'm sure UMD has some great programs, but they're not Caltech. They're not MIT. I'm not even sure they're WPI, or Stevens, or RIT.


Huh? Do you know something I don’t? Doesn’t MIT offer need based aid only? And even getting in with super high stats is a crap shoot.

+1

Choosing UMD over low rated SLAC is being a realist.

And yes that PP is a snob about schools. They talk about "universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious" right after they state that "I'm not a snob about schools".. lol.

Also, UMD CS is rated T20 in the country, WPI, Stevens, RIT? Not T20. UMD is rated T20 public university in the country.

That ^PP is an idiot, and insecure.


Intellectually prestigious isn't the same as these rankings you chase because of football teams. (Yes, I'm aware that UMD's computer science department's rank isn't based on their football team, but going from some earlier posts, I'm not sure all of you are.)

There are some schools that incubator really really genius kids and create amazing, collaborative cohorts. Look, I wasn't that kind of kid. My kid isn't that kind of kid. It's just that I know a lot of them, and that's why I think the experience is worth it, if you're lucky enough to have the chance.

I'm bowing out. Ty all for continuing to prove, as always, dcurbanmom gotta dcuutbsnmom.

Ironically, the Big 10 was mentioned because it is considered the strongest academically of all the major sports conferences. Was not in the context of the sports themselves. And UMD/Purdue are priced the lowest in-state in this very respected academically conference.


I'm really not trying to troll you, I'm just trying to interject with a reality check.

UMD is ranked 19 in US News and World Report's top schools. I've seen posters here regularly dismiss higher-ranked state schools in states like Ohio, New Jersey, Wisconsin, etc.

A large number of state schools have tuition for in-state hovering around 7-8k, not 11k. New York is one example. I believe Virginia and North Carolina are others.

It's cheaper to go to a SUNY out of state than it is to go to UMD, or UMBC. I'm sure you all don't think it would be as good, but if one wants a job that isn't reliant on Leidos or NIH, it's probably better.

I don't care about rank. I care about education, price, and quality of life. I think it would be worth people with kids actually attending UMD to stop acting like their kid with a 1550 SAT won the lottery by being allowed to go to night school there. If it were my high-stats kid and that's all my state flagship had for me, I'd think there was something seriously wrong.

But here on dcurbanmom, as ever, you all chase imaginary brass rings all the time. Congratulations on UMD, to your kids who got in!! And for those who did not, there's a lot of silver lining. The people here? Your kid won't have to deal with them.



Virginia public universities are more than UMD when comparing instate tuition. If you’re referring to Virginia as UVA, there’s no question it’s more. VA Tech - tuition and fees: 15,478, UVA for college of engineering tuition and fees: $29,802, GMU tuition and fees $14,581.
UMD-CP instate tuition and fees for 2024-25 $11,700


And does Virginia defer them to spring and make them go to class at night as well? No? Well, don't worry. I'm sure your kid won't mind walking to class in the dark in February when everyone in their dorm is chilling.

Freshman Connections is only the first semester. Only have evening classes in February if the choose to.


Apologies. November, then.

dp.. it's not that dark in Nov. What on earth is your problem?
Anonymous
FC also allows them to spread out the kids taking cs1, calc1, engl101, etc. Fc kids either wait til spring, when many regular admits are in the next class, or take the after 3 Fc class in the fall.. And there is some attrition too I suppose. Fc is really not notably different than non FC admission.
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Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:To answer several persistent questions...

Honors>>>>Scholars>>other stuff

Money comes later (Mid-late Feb?) but don't expect a lot in-state, if anything. And Honors is *not* a guarantee of money though probably better chance but some non Honors admits get money too. BK, is, (I think) from Honors admits only however.

Honors is worthwhile if just for the housing and you may find it useful generally too. UH and Aces have the best housing and UH housing (PC and JW) is more convenient than ACES (PF Hall). There are other perfectly fine dorms too if you aren't Honors or are in other Honors programs. UH is easily the biggest Honors program, its the default, least specialized) but best housing and most class options.

There are also Honors versions of some key classes available only to Honors kids. Calculus, for example, and at least in that, all class hours are with the instructor in smaller classes. No discussion section with a TA, no huge lecture hall. Note, many TAs are fantastic, not trying to be critical.

Other programs (Scholars, etc) can be good opportunities but consider the cost (in time/effort): benefit analysis. Consider it even with Honors. Its 15 Credits in Honors. Is the payoff worth it? With the housing, yes, imo. Absent that...maybe.

FC is no big deal. In fact, kids I know like it. Don't view it as a failure. Look at some of the kids who didn't get in...its just a way for them to take more of the kids they should have taken in the first place...

Comp Sci..it will be much harder to declare CS for anyone not admitted directly. Not impossible but I would say do not count on it. Up til now, changing to CS has been fairly easy. Not easy anymore. Have a plan B or go somewhere else.

Thanks for the pertinent info. Does Honors guarantee housing for 4 yrs?

No most of the programs are 2 years. Varies by program. Info on website


That is inaccurate. Even if a program is 2 years, honors students are guaranteed 4 years of housing on campus. However, I don’t know any UMD student that stayed on campus 4 years. They all move off campus.


I made the mistake of checking a UMD Facebook group today. It wasn't even about housing. Except it was. Housing was all it was. Grim, tiny rooms in cheap apartment complexes in Greenbelt. Parking lots and highways. 1,000 a month to live with four roommates like you're in an exurban dystopia. What fun.

Huh? Thousands of student live within a half mile of campus. Something like 10 apartment complexes within walking distance.


Grim tiny rooms next to a highway in College Park? Where do I sign?


Maybe it’s time for your snowflake to live their own life?


Y'all are so defensive about a school no one else in the country cares about. I just think it's sad to see so many highly intelligent kids with so much potential pigeonholed into such narrow boxes in such an ugly provincial place.


Geez. You sound like you have a chip on your shoulder. No one gives a crap about what you think.


Not at all, lol. College Park was never on our list because it's an ugly, provincial place. It honestly just makes me sad, with so many excellent colleges out there that so many of you have such a small window for "success" for your kids. You only want them to have one of two or three majors, you only want them to stay in this area, you only want them to work for a limited number of government-subsidized local companies or agencies.

Your kids have so much potential, and this is all you can see.

dp.. my kid's potential is a double STEM major +1 year master, graduating in 4 years from UMD because that's what they want.

"Excellent" college is subjective. My DC#2 absolutely does not want a SLAC in the middle of nowhere. They would call that "provincial", and boring AF.

UMD is T50. Why on earth would people pay money for a college that is rated much much lower, and where the job prospects are much lower. Most of us don't have family money such that our kids can just do whatever they want and not think about getting a good paying job? Do you know how many grads can't find decent jobs after college?

I want my kids to go wherever they want. I have encouraged them to go study abroad. My spouse is a dual citizen, and we've encouraged them to go live in that country for a while. I've also told them to not be tied to this area. I'm originally from CA, and DC#2 wants to move back there at some point.

So you are also wrong about UMD parents wanting them to live "provincial" lives. This area is a very diverse area, more so than the Bay Area where I moved from. If my kids want to stay here, I see nothing wrong with that. It's more diverse than the vast majority of cities around the world. Ask anyone who has lived in a different country and who now lives here (like my spouse). Also, my kids are biracial, and there are some places in this country and around the world that I would not want them to live in.

You sound like an utter snob and completely clueless.


It's pretty normal not to find a job right after college--not the kind of job you mean, anyway. It's beyond privileged to think your kids are entitled to a good job right out of school, no matter where they go.

A few years of working your way up isn't the worst thing in life. You keep talking about how privileged you think other people are, then you have the gall to list your own privileges like they're nothing. Our kid has dual citizenship too, actually, being one half of an immigrant household, and it's fantastic they'll have the opportunity to use it someday.

Stop acting like UMD is some cheap community college with one breath, and then acting like it's the most prestigious place in the world with the next: it's neither. It's a state college in, as I said before, a state that most of the rest of the country doesn't care about. It's a fine school. I just don't think it's enough of a fine school to justify this kind of cutthroat admissions, or to justify staggering its freshmen admissions, or to justify paying full price for. Your opinion may differ.

I'm sure you're proud that your kid got in (unless you're the poster whose kids aren't even in college and then you're just sad... Because in all seriousness, odds are they won't get in.)

As for your kids being biracial, if you left your liberal bubble more, you might notice that no one really cares.


Not the poster you are replying to, but I am the poster whose kid isn’t applying this year. Thanks for the negativity. My kid has as much chance as the kid who got rejected from engineering which is why I’m so interested in this thread. That is, most kids with her stats would get in.


Well then, perhaps take a moment to consider why so many people are taking such high-acheiving kids with so much potential and trying to fit them through the same narrow doorway to stand in a very crowded room.

I don't hate UMD. I don't care if you believe me or not, but I don't.

But I do think there's something really wrong with our culture when it pushes all of its kids into the same little box. This whole UMD computer science/engineering cluster is truly insane.

I say that as outside observer: it makes absolutely no sense to me why you'd put your kids through this, especially when the odds of them getting into ivies and tech schools outside of Maryland are higher than they are for College Park. To summarize: your kids can get more money to go someplace else that's better or equal in prestige, and you're all still lined up at the same narrow hole.

(And then there's the fact that your favorite spectator sport is apparently watching other peoples' kids--mostly poorer kids--get brain damage for school spirit...)

Yeah, I don't get it.


As has already been said, for many of us it’s about the dollar amount and the value for money. $30k a year for UMD or $90k for MIT?


I think you don't understand that with its massive endowment and your kid's scores, you wouldn't pay 90k for MIT. It's true, (I don't know for sure, but I suspect), you might pay 45-50k, unless you're actually poor, in which case you'd pay nothing.

Is MIT worth beg, borrowing, or cashing in a 401k to make the difference?

Over UMD?

Uh... Yeah. Yeah, it is. In so many ways you can't imagine.

I'm not a snob about schools, (despite the crap I've said about UMD), but I am a realist. The universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious... if your kid has a shot at them, you don't turn it down. Not only will it offer them career benefits for life, not only will it open alumni and corporate doors, they'll receive exceptional educations. I'm sure UMD has some great programs, but they're not Caltech. They're not MIT. I'm not even sure they're WPI, or Stevens, or RIT.


Huh? Do you know something I don’t? Doesn’t MIT offer need based aid only? And even getting in with super high stats is a crap shoot.

+1

Choosing UMD over low rated SLAC is being a realist.

And yes that PP is a snob about schools. They talk about "universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious" right after they state that "I'm not a snob about schools".. lol.

Also, UMD CS is rated T20 in the country, WPI, Stevens, RIT? Not T20. UMD is rated T20 public university in the country.

That ^PP is an idiot, and insecure.


Intellectually prestigious isn't the same as these rankings you chase because of football teams. (Yes, I'm aware that UMD's computer science department's rank isn't based on their football team, but going from some earlier posts, I'm not sure all of you are.)

There are some schools that incubator really really genius kids and create amazing, collaborative cohorts. Look, I wasn't that kind of kid. My kid isn't that kind of kid. It's just that I know a lot of them, and that's why I think the experience is worth it, if you're lucky enough to have the chance.

I'm bowing out. Ty all for continuing to prove, as always, dcurbanmom gotta dcuutbsnmom.

Ironically, the Big 10 was mentioned because it is considered the strongest academically of all the major sports conferences. Was not in the context of the sports themselves. And UMD/Purdue are priced the lowest in-state in this very respected academically conference.


I'm really not trying to troll you, I'm just trying to interject with a reality check.

UMD is ranked 19 in US News and World Report's top schools. I've seen posters here regularly dismiss higher-ranked state schools in states like Ohio, New Jersey, Wisconsin, etc.

A large number of state schools have tuition for in-state hovering around 7-8k, not 11k. New York is one example. I believe Virginia and North Carolina are others.

It's cheaper to go to a SUNY out of state than it is to go to UMD, or UMBC. I'm sure you all don't think it would be as good, but if one wants a job that isn't reliant on Leidos or NIH, it's probably better.

I don't care about rank. I care about education, price, and quality of life. I think it would be worth people with kids actually attending UMD to stop acting like their kid with a 1550 SAT won the lottery by being allowed to go to night school there. If it were my high-stats kid and that's all my state flagship had for me, I'd think there was something seriously wrong.

But here on dcurbanmom, as ever, you all chase imaginary brass rings all the time. Congratulations on UMD, to your kids who got in!! And for those who did not, there's a lot of silver lining. The people here? Your kid won't have to deal with them.



Virginia public universities are more than UMD when comparing instate tuition. If you’re referring to Virginia as UVA, there’s no question it’s more. VA Tech - tuition and fees: 15,478, UVA for college of engineering tuition and fees: $29,802, GMU tuition and fees $14,581.
UMD-CP instate tuition and fees for 2024-25 $11,700


And does Virginia defer them to spring and make them go to class at night as well? No? Well, don't worry. I'm sure your kid won't mind walking to class in the dark in February when everyone in their dorm is chilling.

Freshman Connections is only the first semester. Only have evening classes in February if the choose to.


Apologies. November, then.

dp.. it's not that dark in Nov. What on earth is your problem?

DP. The poster in question has been on multiple threads bashing UMD because their student was a spring admit.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:Doesn’t Northeastern do something similar by having some freshmen start in London first semester?


I know a kid whom just HAD to go to Northeastern. So they let him in on the condition that he spend the entire first year in London.

I thought it was kind of dumb.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
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Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:To answer several persistent questions...

Honors>>>>Scholars>>other stuff

Money comes later (Mid-late Feb?) but don't expect a lot in-state, if anything. And Honors is *not* a guarantee of money though probably better chance but some non Honors admits get money too. BK, is, (I think) from Honors admits only however.

Honors is worthwhile if just for the housing and you may find it useful generally too. UH and Aces have the best housing and UH housing (PC and JW) is more convenient than ACES (PF Hall). There are other perfectly fine dorms too if you aren't Honors or are in other Honors programs. UH is easily the biggest Honors program, its the default, least specialized) but best housing and most class options.

There are also Honors versions of some key classes available only to Honors kids. Calculus, for example, and at least in that, all class hours are with the instructor in smaller classes. No discussion section with a TA, no huge lecture hall. Note, many TAs are fantastic, not trying to be critical.

Other programs (Scholars, etc) can be good opportunities but consider the cost (in time/effort): benefit analysis. Consider it even with Honors. Its 15 Credits in Honors. Is the payoff worth it? With the housing, yes, imo. Absent that...maybe.

FC is no big deal. In fact, kids I know like it. Don't view it as a failure. Look at some of the kids who didn't get in...its just a way for them to take more of the kids they should have taken in the first place...

Comp Sci..it will be much harder to declare CS for anyone not admitted directly. Not impossible but I would say do not count on it. Up til now, changing to CS has been fairly easy. Not easy anymore. Have a plan B or go somewhere else.

Thanks for the pertinent info. Does Honors guarantee housing for 4 yrs?

No most of the programs are 2 years. Varies by program. Info on website


That is inaccurate. Even if a program is 2 years, honors students are guaranteed 4 years of housing on campus. However, I don’t know any UMD student that stayed on campus 4 years. They all move off campus.


I made the mistake of checking a UMD Facebook group today. It wasn't even about housing. Except it was. Housing was all it was. Grim, tiny rooms in cheap apartment complexes in Greenbelt. Parking lots and highways. 1,000 a month to live with four roommates like you're in an exurban dystopia. What fun.

Huh? Thousands of student live within a half mile of campus. Something like 10 apartment complexes within walking distance.


Grim tiny rooms next to a highway in College Park? Where do I sign?


Maybe it’s time for your snowflake to live their own life?


Y'all are so defensive about a school no one else in the country cares about. I just think it's sad to see so many highly intelligent kids with so much potential pigeonholed into such narrow boxes in such an ugly provincial place.


Geez. You sound like you have a chip on your shoulder. No one gives a crap about what you think.


Not at all, lol. College Park was never on our list because it's an ugly, provincial place. It honestly just makes me sad, with so many excellent colleges out there that so many of you have such a small window for "success" for your kids. You only want them to have one of two or three majors, you only want them to stay in this area, you only want them to work for a limited number of government-subsidized local companies or agencies.

Your kids have so much potential, and this is all you can see.

dp.. my kid's potential is a double STEM major +1 year master, graduating in 4 years from UMD because that's what they want.

"Excellent" college is subjective. My DC#2 absolutely does not want a SLAC in the middle of nowhere. They would call that "provincial", and boring AF.

UMD is T50. Why on earth would people pay money for a college that is rated much much lower, and where the job prospects are much lower. Most of us don't have family money such that our kids can just do whatever they want and not think about getting a good paying job? Do you know how many grads can't find decent jobs after college?

I want my kids to go wherever they want. I have encouraged them to go study abroad. My spouse is a dual citizen, and we've encouraged them to go live in that country for a while. I've also told them to not be tied to this area. I'm originally from CA, and DC#2 wants to move back there at some point.

So you are also wrong about UMD parents wanting them to live "provincial" lives. This area is a very diverse area, more so than the Bay Area where I moved from. If my kids want to stay here, I see nothing wrong with that. It's more diverse than the vast majority of cities around the world. Ask anyone who has lived in a different country and who now lives here (like my spouse). Also, my kids are biracial, and there are some places in this country and around the world that I would not want them to live in.

You sound like an utter snob and completely clueless.


It's pretty normal not to find a job right after college--not the kind of job you mean, anyway. It's beyond privileged to think your kids are entitled to a good job right out of school, no matter where they go.

A few years of working your way up isn't the worst thing in life. You keep talking about how privileged you think other people are, then you have the gall to list your own privileges like they're nothing. Our kid has dual citizenship too, actually, being one half of an immigrant household, and it's fantastic they'll have the opportunity to use it someday.

Stop acting like UMD is some cheap community college with one breath, and then acting like it's the most prestigious place in the world with the next: it's neither. It's a state college in, as I said before, a state that most of the rest of the country doesn't care about. It's a fine school. I just don't think it's enough of a fine school to justify this kind of cutthroat admissions, or to justify staggering its freshmen admissions, or to justify paying full price for. Your opinion may differ.

I'm sure you're proud that your kid got in (unless you're the poster whose kids aren't even in college and then you're just sad... Because in all seriousness, odds are they won't get in.)

As for your kids being biracial, if you left your liberal bubble more, you might notice that no one really cares.


Not the poster you are replying to, but I am the poster whose kid isn’t applying this year. Thanks for the negativity. My kid has as much chance as the kid who got rejected from engineering which is why I’m so interested in this thread. That is, most kids with her stats would get in.


Well then, perhaps take a moment to consider why so many people are taking such high-acheiving kids with so much potential and trying to fit them through the same narrow doorway to stand in a very crowded room.

I don't hate UMD. I don't care if you believe me or not, but I don't.

But I do think there's something really wrong with our culture when it pushes all of its kids into the same little box. This whole UMD computer science/engineering cluster is truly insane.

I say that as outside observer: it makes absolutely no sense to me why you'd put your kids through this, especially when the odds of them getting into ivies and tech schools outside of Maryland are higher than they are for College Park. To summarize: your kids can get more money to go someplace else that's better or equal in prestige, and you're all still lined up at the same narrow hole.

(And then there's the fact that your favorite spectator sport is apparently watching other peoples' kids--mostly poorer kids--get brain damage for school spirit...)

Yeah, I don't get it.


As has already been said, for many of us it’s about the dollar amount and the value for money. $30k a year for UMD or $90k for MIT?


I think you don't understand that with its massive endowment and your kid's scores, you wouldn't pay 90k for MIT. It's true, (I don't know for sure, but I suspect), you might pay 45-50k, unless you're actually poor, in which case you'd pay nothing.

Is MIT worth beg, borrowing, or cashing in a 401k to make the difference?

Over UMD?

Uh... Yeah. Yeah, it is. In so many ways you can't imagine.

I'm not a snob about schools, (despite the crap I've said about UMD), but I am a realist. The universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious... if your kid has a shot at them, you don't turn it down. Not only will it offer them career benefits for life, not only will it open alumni and corporate doors, they'll receive exceptional educations. I'm sure UMD has some great programs, but they're not Caltech. They're not MIT. I'm not even sure they're WPI, or Stevens, or RIT.


Huh? Do you know something I don’t? Doesn’t MIT offer need based aid only? And even getting in with super high stats is a crap shoot.

+1

Choosing UMD over low rated SLAC is being a realist.

And yes that PP is a snob about schools. They talk about "universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious" right after they state that "I'm not a snob about schools".. lol.

Also, UMD CS is rated T20 in the country, WPI, Stevens, RIT? Not T20. UMD is rated T20 public university in the country.

That ^PP is an idiot, and insecure.


Intellectually prestigious isn't the same as these rankings you chase because of football teams. (Yes, I'm aware that UMD's computer science department's rank isn't based on their football team, but going from some earlier posts, I'm not sure all of you are.)

There are some schools that incubator really really genius kids and create amazing, collaborative cohorts. Look, I wasn't that kind of kid. My kid isn't that kind of kid. It's just that I know a lot of them, and that's why I think the experience is worth it, if you're lucky enough to have the chance.

I'm bowing out. Ty all for continuing to prove, as always, dcurbanmom gotta dcuutbsnmom.

Ironically, the Big 10 was mentioned because it is considered the strongest academically of all the major sports conferences. Was not in the context of the sports themselves. And UMD/Purdue are priced the lowest in-state in this very respected academically conference.


I'm really not trying to troll you, I'm just trying to interject with a reality check.

UMD is ranked 19 in US News and World Report's top schools. I've seen posters here regularly dismiss higher-ranked state schools in states like Ohio, New Jersey, Wisconsin, etc.

A large number of state schools have tuition for in-state hovering around 7-8k, not 11k. New York is one example. I believe Virginia and North Carolina are others.

It's cheaper to go to a SUNY out of state than it is to go to UMD, or UMBC. I'm sure you all don't think it would be as good, but if one wants a job that isn't reliant on Leidos or NIH, it's probably better.

I don't care about rank. I care about education, price, and quality of life. I think it would be worth people with kids actually attending UMD to stop acting like their kid with a 1550 SAT won the lottery by being allowed to go to night school there. If it were my high-stats kid and that's all my state flagship had for me, I'd think there was something seriously wrong.

But here on dcurbanmom, as ever, you all chase imaginary brass rings all the time. Congratulations on UMD, to your kids who got in!! And for those who did not, there's a lot of silver lining. The people here? Your kid won't have to deal with them.



Virginia public universities are more than UMD when comparing instate tuition. If you’re referring to Virginia as UVA, there’s no question it’s more. VA Tech - tuition and fees: 15,478, UVA for college of engineering tuition and fees: $29,802, GMU tuition and fees $14,581.
UMD-CP instate tuition and fees for 2024-25 $11,700


And does Virginia defer them to spring and make them go to class at night as well? No? Well, don't worry. I'm sure your kid won't mind walking to class in the dark in February when everyone in their dorm is chilling.

Freshman Connections is only the first semester. Only have evening classes in February if the choose to.


Apologies. November, then.

dp.. it's not that dark in Nov. What on earth is your problem?

DP. The poster in question has been on multiple threads bashing UMD because their student was a spring admit.


A few things:

I'm not a stem person, but I believe November and February are fairly equal in terms of how dark it is. November may even be worse. Something about the sun... winter... Idk.

Again, nope. That poor woman, getting confused for me.
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Anonymous wrote:Doesn’t Northeastern do something similar by having some freshmen start in London first semester?


I know a kid whom just HAD to go to Northeastern. So they let him in on the condition that he spend the entire first year in London.

I thought it was kind of dumb.


It's a path to NEU if that's what your kid really wants. However, the yield for that program (GS---likely that was fall 2022 since now it's split between London and Oakland CA) is low. That year they offered well over 1000 spots and I think they got 150-200 kids max.

However, I wouldn't recommend a spring start where you will NOT get your desired major. Plenty of excellent places to get a CS degree that you won't have to compete to get into the program or get into the desired courses. I would only take an "alternative start" if my kid can still do their actual desired program (and with NEU that could mean an extra semester, not due to COOP but due to not having the courses you need with the abroad programs if you are advanced).
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Anonymous wrote:To answer several persistent questions...

Honors>>>>Scholars>>other stuff

Money comes later (Mid-late Feb?) but don't expect a lot in-state, if anything. And Honors is *not* a guarantee of money though probably better chance but some non Honors admits get money too. BK, is, (I think) from Honors admits only however.

Honors is worthwhile if just for the housing and you may find it useful generally too. UH and Aces have the best housing and UH housing (PC and JW) is more convenient than ACES (PF Hall). There are other perfectly fine dorms too if you aren't Honors or are in other Honors programs. UH is easily the biggest Honors program, its the default, least specialized) but best housing and most class options.

There are also Honors versions of some key classes available only to Honors kids. Calculus, for example, and at least in that, all class hours are with the instructor in smaller classes. No discussion section with a TA, no huge lecture hall. Note, many TAs are fantastic, not trying to be critical.

Other programs (Scholars, etc) can be good opportunities but consider the cost (in time/effort): benefit analysis. Consider it even with Honors. Its 15 Credits in Honors. Is the payoff worth it? With the housing, yes, imo. Absent that...maybe.

FC is no big deal. In fact, kids I know like it. Don't view it as a failure. Look at some of the kids who didn't get in...its just a way for them to take more of the kids they should have taken in the first place...

Comp Sci..it will be much harder to declare CS for anyone not admitted directly. Not impossible but I would say do not count on it. Up til now, changing to CS has been fairly easy. Not easy anymore. Have a plan B or go somewhere else.

Thanks for the pertinent info. Does Honors guarantee housing for 4 yrs?

No most of the programs are 2 years. Varies by program. Info on website


That is inaccurate. Even if a program is 2 years, honors students are guaranteed 4 years of housing on campus. However, I don’t know any UMD student that stayed on campus 4 years. They all move off campus.


I made the mistake of checking a UMD Facebook group today. It wasn't even about housing. Except it was. Housing was all it was. Grim, tiny rooms in cheap apartment complexes in Greenbelt. Parking lots and highways. 1,000 a month to live with four roommates like you're in an exurban dystopia. What fun.

Huh? Thousands of student live within a half mile of campus. Something like 10 apartment complexes within walking distance.


Grim tiny rooms next to a highway in College Park? Where do I sign?


Maybe it’s time for your snowflake to live their own life?


Y'all are so defensive about a school no one else in the country cares about. I just think it's sad to see so many highly intelligent kids with so much potential pigeonholed into such narrow boxes in such an ugly provincial place.


Geez. You sound like you have a chip on your shoulder. No one gives a crap about what you think.


Not at all, lol. College Park was never on our list because it's an ugly, provincial place. It honestly just makes me sad, with so many excellent colleges out there that so many of you have such a small window for "success" for your kids. You only want them to have one of two or three majors, you only want them to stay in this area, you only want them to work for a limited number of government-subsidized local companies or agencies.

Your kids have so much potential, and this is all you can see.

dp.. my kid's potential is a double STEM major +1 year master, graduating in 4 years from UMD because that's what they want.

"Excellent" college is subjective. My DC#2 absolutely does not want a SLAC in the middle of nowhere. They would call that "provincial", and boring AF.

UMD is T50. Why on earth would people pay money for a college that is rated much much lower, and where the job prospects are much lower. Most of us don't have family money such that our kids can just do whatever they want and not think about getting a good paying job? Do you know how many grads can't find decent jobs after college?

I want my kids to go wherever they want. I have encouraged them to go study abroad. My spouse is a dual citizen, and we've encouraged them to go live in that country for a while. I've also told them to not be tied to this area. I'm originally from CA, and DC#2 wants to move back there at some point.

So you are also wrong about UMD parents wanting them to live "provincial" lives. This area is a very diverse area, more so than the Bay Area where I moved from. If my kids want to stay here, I see nothing wrong with that. It's more diverse than the vast majority of cities around the world. Ask anyone who has lived in a different country and who now lives here (like my spouse). Also, my kids are biracial, and there are some places in this country and around the world that I would not want them to live in.

You sound like an utter snob and completely clueless.


It's pretty normal not to find a job right after college--not the kind of job you mean, anyway. It's beyond privileged to think your kids are entitled to a good job right out of school, no matter where they go.

A few years of working your way up isn't the worst thing in life. You keep talking about how privileged you think other people are, then you have the gall to list your own privileges like they're nothing. Our kid has dual citizenship too, actually, being one half of an immigrant household, and it's fantastic they'll have the opportunity to use it someday.

Stop acting like UMD is some cheap community college with one breath, and then acting like it's the most prestigious place in the world with the next: it's neither. It's a state college in, as I said before, a state that most of the rest of the country doesn't care about. It's a fine school. I just don't think it's enough of a fine school to justify this kind of cutthroat admissions, or to justify staggering its freshmen admissions, or to justify paying full price for. Your opinion may differ.

I'm sure you're proud that your kid got in (unless you're the poster whose kids aren't even in college and then you're just sad... Because in all seriousness, odds are they won't get in.)

As for your kids being biracial, if you left your liberal bubble more, you might notice that no one really cares.


Not the poster you are replying to, but I am the poster whose kid isn’t applying this year. Thanks for the negativity. My kid has as much chance as the kid who got rejected from engineering which is why I’m so interested in this thread. That is, most kids with her stats would get in.


Well then, perhaps take a moment to consider why so many people are taking such high-acheiving kids with so much potential and trying to fit them through the same narrow doorway to stand in a very crowded room.

I don't hate UMD. I don't care if you believe me or not, but I don't.

But I do think there's something really wrong with our culture when it pushes all of its kids into the same little box. This whole UMD computer science/engineering cluster is truly insane.

I say that as outside observer: it makes absolutely no sense to me why you'd put your kids through this, especially when the odds of them getting into ivies and tech schools outside of Maryland are higher than they are for College Park. To summarize: your kids can get more money to go someplace else that's better or equal in prestige, and you're all still lined up at the same narrow hole.

(And then there's the fact that your favorite spectator sport is apparently watching other peoples' kids--mostly poorer kids--get brain damage for school spirit...)

Yeah, I don't get it.


As has already been said, for many of us it’s about the dollar amount and the value for money. $30k a year for UMD or $90k for MIT?


I think you don't understand that with its massive endowment and your kid's scores, you wouldn't pay 90k for MIT. It's true, (I don't know for sure, but I suspect), you might pay 45-50k, unless you're actually poor, in which case you'd pay nothing.

Is MIT worth beg, borrowing, or cashing in a 401k to make the difference?

Over UMD?

Uh... Yeah. Yeah, it is. In so many ways you can't imagine.

I'm not a snob about schools, (despite the crap I've said about UMD), but I am a realist. The universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious... if your kid has a shot at them, you don't turn it down. Not only will it offer them career benefits for life, not only will it open alumni and corporate doors, they'll receive exceptional educations. I'm sure UMD has some great programs, but they're not Caltech. They're not MIT. I'm not even sure they're WPI, or Stevens, or RIT.


Huh? Do you know something I don’t? Doesn’t MIT offer need based aid only? And even getting in with super high stats is a crap shoot.

+1

Choosing UMD over low rated SLAC is being a realist.

And yes that PP is a snob about schools. They talk about "universities and colleges in this country that are truly, intellectually prestigious" right after they state that "I'm not a snob about schools".. lol.

Also, UMD CS is rated T20 in the country, WPI, Stevens, RIT? Not T20. UMD is rated T20 public university in the country.

That ^PP is an idiot, and insecure.


Intellectually prestigious isn't the same as these rankings you chase because of football teams. (Yes, I'm aware that UMD's computer science department's rank isn't based on their football team, but going from some earlier posts, I'm not sure all of you are.)

There are some schools that incubator really really genius kids and create amazing, collaborative cohorts. Look, I wasn't that kind of kid. My kid isn't that kind of kid. It's just that I know a lot of them, and that's why I think the experience is worth it, if you're lucky enough to have the chance.

I'm bowing out. Ty all for continuing to prove, as always, dcurbanmom gotta dcuutbsnmom.

Ironically, the Big 10 was mentioned because it is considered the strongest academically of all the major sports conferences. Was not in the context of the sports themselves. And UMD/Purdue are priced the lowest in-state in this very respected academically conference.


I'm really not trying to troll you, I'm just trying to interject with a reality check.

UMD is ranked 19 in US News and World Report's top schools. I've seen posters here regularly dismiss higher-ranked state schools in states like Ohio, New Jersey, Wisconsin, etc.

A large number of state schools have tuition for in-state hovering around 7-8k, not 11k. New York is one example. I believe Virginia and North Carolina are others.

It's cheaper to go to a SUNY out of state than it is to go to UMD, or UMBC. I'm sure you all don't think it would be as good, but if one wants a job that isn't reliant on Leidos or NIH, it's probably better.

I don't care about rank. I care about education, price, and quality of life. I think it would be worth people with kids actually attending UMD to stop acting like their kid with a 1550 SAT won the lottery by being allowed to go to night school there. If it were my high-stats kid and that's all my state flagship had for me, I'd think there was something seriously wrong.

But here on dcurbanmom, as ever, you all chase imaginary brass rings all the time. Congratulations on UMD, to your kids who got in!! And for those who did not, there's a lot of silver lining. The people here? Your kid won't have to deal with them.



Virginia public universities are more than UMD when comparing instate tuition. If you’re referring to Virginia as UVA, there’s no question it’s more. VA Tech - tuition and fees: 15,478, UVA for college of engineering tuition and fees: $29,802, GMU tuition and fees $14,581.
UMD-CP instate tuition and fees for 2024-25 $11,700


And does Virginia defer them to spring and make them go to class at night as well? No? Well, don't worry. I'm sure your kid won't mind walking to class in the dark in February when everyone in their dorm is chilling.

Freshman Connections is only the first semester. Only have evening classes in February if the choose to.


Apologies. November, then.

dp.. it's not that dark in Nov. What on earth is your problem?

DP. The poster in question has been on multiple threads bashing UMD because their student was a spring admit.


A few things:

I'm not a stem person, but I believe November and February are fairly equal in terms of how dark it is. November may even be worse. Something about the sun... winter... Idk.

Again, nope. That poor woman, getting confused for me.

I mean, if you live up in NE then, November is dark at 5, but it's not that dark here by 5. And November is not winter. You must not even live around here.
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