Private elementary for ASD?

Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:There are always a few kids at every mainstream private with SN. Sometimes they are apparent at application but sometimes not. Landon has a number in DC's grade.


A family member who attended Landon and had ADHD struggled socially and academically. I don’t think he stayed in touch with anyone. Just because there are SN kids at a mainstream private does not mean that they are all thriving. And HFA can be more challenging to manage than ADHD, especially if the latter is mild. Mainstream progressive schools may be accepting of some SNs but those environments will require masking to fit in and fitting in will still be difficult, especially starting in upper elementary.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:There are always a few kids at every mainstream private with SN. Sometimes they are apparent at application but sometimes not. Landon has a number in DC's grade.


SN is a very catch-all term for this purpose. Dyslexia, anxiety, ADHD, ASD all have different needs profiles (and within those there are subprofiles) and ASD is where most mainstream privates seem to draw a line in terms of admissions. I have nothing against this selectivity - they have the right not to want to spend extra $ for learning and social support for this profile. Sometimes children are diagnosed while they are already a student in a mainstream private. Those cases are more delicate, but a good share of kids ends up being counseled out from what I gather from anecdotal evidence.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:OP, based on your description, I’m not sure why you would pay 40k a year for the most restrictive environment. Why would he get more attention in that situation? Surely they will focus more on the kids who need more instruction in behavior, social skills, academics. If he has mild to mild/moderate needs in social skills, and other kids have equal to more needs, how does that benefit your son? Even if there is another peer or two on your son’s level, what if they just don’t like each other? That’s the benefit to a larger pool in public. Or a mainstream private; I’m not sure about those.


This is exactly why I am asking this question - to get a similar cohort and minimize chances of being in a group with children who have more behaviors and needs. But I got chewed out a bit for this up-thread. The way I understand it, private SN schools self select students of specific profiles and with needs they can effectively support. I don't see is as most restrictive environment, I see it as most supportive environment. In a reputable SN school he can still pursue general education academically but will get more attention and explicit instruction and supports in his areas of need. Which is why I am willing to pay the price tag (btw is a lot of money for our family as we're not wealthy).

My child is in multiple activities, and we have a circle of families from his pre-school, so his pool of peers would not be limited to just classmates in a small SN elementary. What he is lacking is being able to make friends, it doesn't happen organically and that's where good social supports help - to teach a skill or understanding of a concept that's customized to his learning style and abilities. Just sticking him into a large classroom in a public or regular private school with many different kids will not mean he will make friends. I don't know if you have a SN kid, but specifically with ASD kids it doesn't work like that. Maybe if someone had only learning differences or ADHD - that could work in theory, autism is a very different disability.
Anonymous
OP, you mentioned you haven't done a "full neuropsych" yet due to your DC's age. Just want to mention that we are in a similar boat and got a "developmental assessement" from the Center for Assessment and Treatment. It is really detailed and has specific recommendations for supports and for the IEP. We are really glad we did the assessment since it identified the specific supports that are important for our child. The diagnosis itself is helpful but the support needs are much more important to understand.
Anonymous
Hi OP-we are a former Maddux family and your son sounds like a Maddux kid from what I can tell. Also, depending on how much direct social skills support he needs, I would take a look at Barnesville and also Friends Community School (in PG county). You won’t get the same social skills curriculum as Maddux, but from what I can tell from talking to other parents, Barnesville and FCS could be a potential option for a structured, nurturing, small, mainstream school with a knowledgeable learning specialist and other kids with ASD level 1 there.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:OP, based on your description, I’m not sure why you would pay 40k a year for the most restrictive environment. Why would he get more attention in that situation? Surely they will focus more on the kids who need more instruction in behavior, social skills, academics. If he has mild to mild/moderate needs in social skills, and other kids have equal to more needs, how does that benefit your son? Even if there is another peer or two on your son’s level, what if they just don’t like each other? That’s the benefit to a larger pool in public. Or a mainstream private; I’m not sure about those.


This is exactly why I am asking this question - to get a similar cohort and minimize chances of being in a group with children who have more behaviors and needs. But I got chewed out a bit for this up-thread. The way I understand it, private SN schools self select students of specific profiles and with needs they can effectively support. I don't see is as most restrictive environment, I see it as most supportive environment. In a reputable SN school he can still pursue general education academically but will get more attention and explicit instruction and supports in his areas of need. Which is why I am willing to pay the price tag (btw is a lot of money for our family as we're not wealthy).

My child is in multiple activities, and we have a circle of families from his pre-school, so his pool of peers would not be limited to just classmates in a small SN elementary. What he is lacking is being able to make friends, it doesn't happen organically and that's where good social supports help - to teach a skill or understanding of a concept that's customized to his learning style and abilities. Just sticking him into a large classroom in a public or regular private school with many different kids will not mean he will make friends. I don't know if you have a SN kid, but specifically with ASD kids it doesn't work like that. Maybe if someone had only learning differences or ADHD - that could work in theory, autism is a very different disability.


You're not getting chewed out, you're being told that the school you're looking for does not exist. The profile of mild special needs and no disruptive behaviors isn't common enough among people willing to pay for private school. It's not enough kids to make an economically viable school. That's why nobody is naming a school.

You do have a bit of a vibe of "I don't want my kid with special needs to have to deal with other kids' special needs." If people are a bit prickly to you that's probably why.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:Hi OP-we are a former Maddux family and your son sounds like a Maddux kid from what I can tell. Also, depending on how much direct social skills support he needs, I would take a look at Barnesville and also Friends Community School (in PG county). You won’t get the same social skills curriculum as Maddux, but from what I can tell from talking to other parents, Barnesville and FCS could be a potential option for a structured, nurturing, small, mainstream school with a knowledgeable learning specialist and other kids with ASD level 1 there.


Thank you so much, it's incredibly helpful. I am looking for a back up option in case Maddux doesn't take us, apparently they have more demand than spots.

May I ask were you went on after Maddux and if you're happy at your current setting?
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:OP, you mentioned you haven't done a "full neuropsych" yet due to your DC's age. Just want to mention that we are in a similar boat and got a "developmental assessement" from the Center for Assessment and Treatment. It is really detailed and has specific recommendations for supports and for the IEP. We are really glad we did the assessment since it identified the specific supports that are important for our child. The diagnosis itself is helpful but the support needs are much more important to understand.


Thank you, this is a great suggestion. We got diagnosis from there 2 years ago, but at that point the child was a toddler and that report is not current in formulating preK and K supports.

May I ask you what was the procedure and experience with "developmental assessment"? Was it a multi day thing with formal testing and a follow up meeting? Which practitioner at CAAT were you with? (I totally understand if you want to limit any disclosure, btw). Our KKI waitlist should come up this fall to coincide with 5th birthday.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:OP, you mentioned you haven't done a "full neuropsych" yet due to your DC's age. Just want to mention that we are in a similar boat and got a "developmental assessement" from the Center for Assessment and Treatment. It is really detailed and has specific recommendations for supports and for the IEP. We are really glad we did the assessment since it identified the specific supports that are important for our child. The diagnosis itself is helpful but the support needs are much more important to understand.


Thank you, this is a great suggestion. We got diagnosis from there 2 years ago, but at that point the child was a toddler and that report is not current in formulating preK and K supports.

May I ask you what was the procedure and experience with "developmental assessment"? Was it a multi day thing with formal testing and a follow up meeting? Which practitioner at CAAT were you with? (I totally understand if you want to limit any disclosure, btw). Our KKI waitlist should come up this fall to coincide with 5th birthday.


Our assessment included a preschool observation and 3 hours of in-office testing split up into two different sessions. The psychologist also did a parent interview and had us and preschool teachers fill out questionnaires. We worked with Dr. Rochelle Drill.

I have heard good things about KKI as well. I have heard that if you call up every so often and ask if there are cancellations, you may be able to get in sooner.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:OP, based on your description, I’m not sure why you would pay 40k a year for the most restrictive environment. Why would he get more attention in that situation? Surely they will focus more on the kids who need more instruction in behavior, social skills, academics. If he has mild to mild/moderate needs in social skills, and other kids have equal to more needs, how does that benefit your son? Even if there is another peer or two on your son’s level, what if they just don’t like each other? That’s the benefit to a larger pool in public. Or a mainstream private; I’m not sure about those.


This is exactly why I am asking this question - to get a similar cohort and minimize chances of being in a group with children who have more behaviors and needs. But I got chewed out a bit for this up-thread. The way I understand it, private SN schools self select students of specific profiles and with needs they can effectively support. I don't see is as most restrictive environment, I see it as most supportive environment. In a reputable SN school he can still pursue general education academically but will get more attention and explicit instruction and supports in his areas of need. Which is why I am willing to pay the price tag (btw is a lot of money for our family as we're not wealthy).

My child is in multiple activities, and we have a circle of families from his pre-school, so his pool of peers would not be limited to just classmates in a small SN elementary. What he is lacking is being able to make friends, it doesn't happen organically and that's where good social supports help - to teach a skill or understanding of a concept that's customized to his learning style and abilities. Just sticking him into a large classroom in a public or regular private school with many different kids will not mean he will make friends. I don't know if you have a SN kid, but specifically with ASD kids it doesn't work like that. Maybe if someone had only learning differences or ADHD - that could work in theory, autism is a very different disability.


You're not getting chewed out, you're being told that the school you're looking for does not exist. The profile of mild special needs and no disruptive behaviors isn't common enough among people willing to pay for private school. It's not enough kids to make an economically viable school. That's why nobody is naming a school.

You do have a bit of a vibe of "I don't want my kid with special needs to have to deal with other kids' special needs." If people are a bit prickly to you that's probably why.


I do feel chewed out, so there is that. Like any other SN parent on here I am just looking for a good match in a school, it's neither unusual nor unreasonable.

In every setting that deals to SN children, there are various options to match kids' needs for support. For example, PEP has 3 different classrooms: Pilot, Classic and Inc. Does it mean that parents in Pilot are unaccepting of needs of children in Classic? No. In this case, the public school system makes the determination whom to put where.

In case of private schools, you get a binary answer when you apply: yes/no. And in case of no, they won't tell you go to school X instead - it's not their domain to make such recommendations. Which is why I am on here, to check if I missed any good options.

By the way, you are dead wrong about economic viability - these schools do exist, if you read the thread.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:OP, based on your description, I’m not sure why you would pay 40k a year for the most restrictive environment. Why would he get more attention in that situation? Surely they will focus more on the kids who need more instruction in behavior, social skills, academics. If he has mild to mild/moderate needs in social skills, and other kids have equal to more needs, how does that benefit your son? Even if there is another peer or two on your son’s level, what if they just don’t like each other? That’s the benefit to a larger pool in public. Or a mainstream private; I’m not sure about those.


This is exactly why I am asking this question - to get a similar cohort and minimize chances of being in a group with children who have more behaviors and needs. But I got chewed out a bit for this up-thread. The way I understand it, private SN schools self select students of specific profiles and with needs they can effectively support. I don't see is as most restrictive environment, I see it as most supportive environment. In a reputable SN school he can still pursue general education academically but will get more attention and explicit instruction and supports in his areas of need. Which is why I am willing to pay the price tag (btw is a lot of money for our family as we're not wealthy).

My child is in multiple activities, and we have a circle of families from his pre-school, so his pool of peers would not be limited to just classmates in a small SN elementary. What he is lacking is being able to make friends, it doesn't happen organically and that's where good social supports help - to teach a skill or understanding of a concept that's customized to his learning style and abilities. Just sticking him into a large classroom in a public or regular private school with many different kids will not mean he will make friends. I don't know if you have a SN kid, but specifically with ASD kids it doesn't work like that. Maybe if someone had only learning differences or ADHD - that could work in theory, autism is a very different disability.


You're not getting chewed out, you're being told that the school you're looking for does not exist. The profile of mild special needs and no disruptive behaviors isn't common enough among people willing to pay for private school. It's not enough kids to make an economically viable school. That's why nobody is naming a school.

You do have a bit of a vibe of "I don't want my kid with special needs to have to deal with other kids' special needs." If people are a bit prickly to you that's probably why.


I do feel chewed out, so there is that. Like any other SN parent on here I am just looking for a good match in a school, it's neither unusual nor unreasonable.

In every setting that deals to SN children, there are various options to match kids' needs for support. For example, PEP has 3 different classrooms: Pilot, Classic and Inc. Does it mean that parents in Pilot are unaccepting of needs of children in Classic? No. In this case, the public school system makes the determination whom to put where.

In case of private schools, you get a binary answer when you apply: yes/no. And in case of no, they won't tell you go to school X instead - it's not their domain to make such recommendations. Which is why I am on here, to check if I missed any good options.

By the way, you are dead wrong about economic viability - these schools do exist, if you read the thread.


Those schools are not no-behavior. That's what you're not going to find.
Anonymous
Maddux was life changing for our child. If you can get accepted and are offered a spot take it! I still wish they went through MS.
Anonymous
OP, I think it’s a bit confusing what you most want your son to get help with. My child so far doesn’t have an ASD diagnosis though it’s been discussed and has very significant ADHD. I don’t know if you would say my child’s issues were disruptive behaviors or not- the private preschool they went to was very frustrated with sensory issues like refusing to sit on a specific carpet and some interrupting. Anyway my child is academically advanced but had social issues and we got feedback that we could work on social issues privately, outside of school because it simply wasn’t worth a SN private just for social skills issues. We toured Green Acres and really liked it but it would have been a serious hike. You could consider it and ask them if they thought they could accommodate your kid. We ultimately did go with public school/IEP and a lot of private supplemental work on social skills and anxiety. It has so far worked out really well. The school counselor does lunch bunches and the teachers have so far been wonderful. Also, My kid is not anyone’s best friend. But people are happy to have them around. Having had the experience of going to school that made you end up 20 minutes away or more from other kids vs being walking distance, I think being convenient is key to being accepted for kids who are not social rock stars. My child is in a neighborhood based scout troop with many kids from their school. These things help much more than you think.

If you have academic issues then I can understand you may need to balance that. It is hard especially at this age when it isn’t clear who much/how fast certain things are going to improve.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:OP, based on your description, I’m not sure why you would pay 40k a year for the most restrictive environment. Why would he get more attention in that situation? Surely they will focus more on the kids who need more instruction in behavior, social skills, academics. If he has mild to mild/moderate needs in social skills, and other kids have equal to more needs, how does that benefit your son? Even if there is another peer or two on your son’s level, what if they just don’t like each other? That’s the benefit to a larger pool in public. Or a mainstream private; I’m not sure about those.


This is exactly why I am asking this question - to get a similar cohort and minimize chances of being in a group with children who have more behaviors and needs. But I got chewed out a bit for this up-thread. The way I understand it, private SN schools self select students of specific profiles and with needs they can effectively support. I don't see is as most restrictive environment, I see it as most supportive environment. In a reputable SN school he can still pursue general education academically but will get more attention and explicit instruction and supports in his areas of need. Which is why I am willing to pay the price tag (btw is a lot of money for our family as we're not wealthy).

My child is in multiple activities, and we have a circle of families from his pre-school, so his pool of peers would not be limited to just classmates in a small SN elementary. What he is lacking is being able to make friends, it doesn't happen organically and that's where good social supports help - to teach a skill or understanding of a concept that's customized to his learning style and abilities. Just sticking him into a large classroom in a public or regular private school with many different kids will not mean he will make friends. I don't know if you have a SN kid, but specifically with ASD kids it doesn't work like that. Maybe if someone had only learning differences or ADHD - that could work in theory, autism is a very different disability.


You're not getting chewed out, you're being told that the school you're looking for does not exist. The profile of mild special needs and no disruptive behaviors isn't common enough among people willing to pay for private school. It's not enough kids to make an economically viable school. That's why nobody is naming a school.

You do have a bit of a vibe of "I don't want my kid with special needs to have to deal with other kids' special needs." If people are a bit prickly to you that's probably why.


I do feel chewed out, so there is that. Like any other SN parent on here I am just looking for a good match in a school, it's neither unusual nor unreasonable.

In every setting that deals to SN children, there are various options to match kids' needs for support. For example, PEP has 3 different classrooms: Pilot, Classic and Inc. Does it mean that parents in Pilot are unaccepting of needs of children in Classic? No. In this case, the public school system makes the determination whom to put where.

In case of private schools, you get a binary answer when you apply: yes/no. And in case of no, they won't tell you go to school X instead - it's not their domain to make such recommendations. Which is why I am on here, to check if I missed any good options.

By the way, you are dead wrong about economic viability - these schools do exist, if you read the thread.


I get you, OP. We have a child who could have used more support at that age but whose needs did not really match a special needs school. We did look at some understanding mainstream privates and DC was accepted but in the end we did stay with public. DC is in middle school now and does not require much support beyond a 504 plan but I do wonder if DC would be doing better socially now if they had gone to a place like Maddux and picked up more of those skills. I hope your child gets in.
Anonymous
OP hasn’t answered what accommodations her child is receiving in the current setting.
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