Private elementary for ASD?

Anonymous
I have a high functioning pre-K child with ASD diagnosis and no disruptive behaviors. Which private schools should I look at for K and onwards, other than Maddux and KTS?

Because of DC's age, we haven't done a full neuropsych yet. I am looking for a school that accommodates ASD with mild to mild-moderate needs in social skills and does not have students with disruptive behaviors. Not considering public with IEP at this time at all.
Anonymous
Perhaps Diener and Auburn
Anonymous
Here's the thing-- if you're serious about a school with no behaviors, then what do you expect to happen if a behavior issue emerges in your kid? Because your child is quite young and it's entirely possible you don't see the full picture of the needs and behaviors yet.

There are hardly any schools where there's no disruptive behavior, so I would suggest being a little more open-minded about it just so that you have more schools to apply to.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:Here's the thing-- if you're serious about a school with no behaviors, then what do you expect to happen if a behavior issue emerges in your kid? Because your child is quite young and it's entirely possible you don't see the full picture of the needs and behaviors yet.

There are hardly any schools where there's no disruptive behavior, so I would suggest being a little more open-minded about it just so that you have more schools to apply to.


You are right in that I can't predict the future behaviors when a child is this young. And if he develops behaviors that require more intensive supports, or starts displaying learning differences I'd move him to a different setting where his profile can be supported. But I am trying to place a child that I have right now - well regulated in a pre-school setting, with support needs at a milder level, concentrated around social skills. Based on the price tag (40K per year fully self-pay) - I'd want a setting that truly suits him best.
Anonymous
Is your child currently in daycare and what supports do they have?
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:Here's the thing-- if you're serious about a school with no behaviors, then what do you expect to happen if a behavior issue emerges in your kid? Because your child is quite young and it's entirely possible you don't see the full picture of the needs and behaviors yet.

There are hardly any schools where there's no disruptive behavior, so I would suggest being a little more open-minded about it just so that you have more schools to apply to.


You are right in that I can't predict the future behaviors when a child is this young. And if he develops behaviors that require more intensive supports, or starts displaying learning differences I'd move him to a different setting where his profile can be supported. But I am trying to place a child that I have right now - well regulated in a pre-school setting, with support needs at a milder level, concentrated around social skills. Based on the price tag (40K per year fully self-pay) - I'd want a setting that truly suits him best.


I think you need to be realistic. If you're looking at SN privates, there's going to be at least some behavior. Because there aren't enough kids with SNs and no behaviors to produce an economically viable school.
Anonymous
The school you want does not exist.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:Here's the thing-- if you're serious about a school with no behaviors, then what do you expect to happen if a behavior issue emerges in your kid? Because your child is quite young and it's entirely possible you don't see the full picture of the needs and behaviors yet.

There are hardly any schools where there's no disruptive behavior, so I would suggest being a little more open-minded about it just so that you have more schools to apply to.


You are right in that I can't predict the future behaviors when a child is this young. And if he develops behaviors that require more intensive supports, or starts displaying learning differences I'd move him to a different setting where his profile can be supported. But I am trying to place a child that I have right now - well regulated in a pre-school setting, with support needs at a milder level, concentrated around social skills. Based on the price tag (40K per year fully self-pay) - I'd want a setting that truly suits him best.


I think you need to be realistic. If you're looking at SN privates, there's going to be at least some behavior. Because there aren't enough kids with SNs and no behaviors to produce an economically viable school.


Sure, I am not looking for unrealistic. But what are the schools that are SN private and with minimal (some) behaviors?
Anonymous
When your child is little, moving him will seem like no big deal. But when a child is older, being counseled out for behavior, or having a tough year where behavior support isn't adequate, can be really hard on the kid emotionally. Plus the loss of friendships which, for a child with social learning needs, can be hard-earned and difficult to replace. Really, OP, re-think being blase about this. It's not the end of the world if your kid is exposed to some behaviors.
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:When your child is little, moving him will seem like no big deal. But when a child is older, being counseled out for behavior, or having a tough year where behavior support isn't adequate, can be really hard on the kid emotionally. Plus the loss of friendships which, for a child with social learning needs, can be hard-earned and difficult to replace. Really, OP, re-think being blase about this. It's not the end of the world if your kid is exposed to some behaviors.


Not helpful based on the question in OP, but OK, I'll bite.

So where would you put a child like that, who is young but may or may not develop [unspecified] issues of [unspecified] intensity at an [unspecified] age? Like give me a school name, and why it's a good idea?
Anonymous
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:When your child is little, moving him will seem like no big deal. But when a child is older, being counseled out for behavior, or having a tough year where behavior support isn't adequate, can be really hard on the kid emotionally. Plus the loss of friendships which, for a child with social learning needs, can be hard-earned and difficult to replace. Really, OP, re-think being blase about this. It's not the end of the world if your kid is exposed to some behaviors.


Not helpful based on the question in OP, but OK, I'll bite.

So where would you put a child like that, who is young but may or may not develop [unspecified] issues of [unspecified] intensity at an [unspecified] age? Like give me a school name, and why it's a good idea?


I think Diener and Auburn are good suggestions. The imaginary school OP wants with no behaviors doesn't exist, so any school that has ASD-1 and -2 as a common student profile would likely be suitable.
Anonymous
You’re going to get behaviors at any school, SN or mainstream. Deiner or Maddox are your best bets.
Anonymous
Small public neighborhood ES with an IEP is really your best bet. If your kid is really bright and doesn't have any behaviors, you can apply to some low key parochial schools but they might not want or feel like they can support ASD. If you are talking about other privates, your child will not be accepted if you disclose ASD.
Anonymous
Maybe River School?
Anonymous
What about McLean?
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